Battles in the East, Civil War Trivia

Wilderness Recap (Links)

It occurred to me that I wrote a LOT of posts about the Wilderness in this last blog series and they were a bit scattered between non-Wilderness posts. So, for the convenience of future readers, here are the links to each of these posts so you'll be able to find them in some reasonable order.… Continue reading Wilderness Recap (Links)

Women in the War

Drama and Scandal in the Wilderness – Phenie Tapp’s Story

On a cold February day in 1860, a child was born in a cabin owned by the widow, Catherine Tapp. The baby girl was named Eliza Frances, but was known to her family and all those in Spotsylvania County as Phenie Tapp. The situation of the child’s birth – and her later escapades as an… Continue reading Drama and Scandal in the Wilderness – Phenie Tapp’s Story

Portraits of Privates

A Missing Soldier in the Wilderness – Wilber Hurlbut

While studying the war from 5,000 feet, it can be easy to disconnect one’s self from the stories of the individuals who bled and died in the conflict. During the nation’s Covid-19 crisis, many historical venues and museums were taking to the internet to continue their education outreach. The National Museum of Civil War Medicine… Continue reading A Missing Soldier in the Wilderness – Wilber Hurlbut

Traveling Tidbits

Visiting The Wilderness

The battle of the Wilderness in May of 1864 was shaped by the terrain, which is why visiting the location itself is so important. The park itself doesn’t have an official Visitor Center like most. Your first stop can be at one of two places, either Ellwood, owned by the Lacey’s during the battle and… Continue reading Visiting The Wilderness

Battles in the East

“Death Held High Carnival” – Widow Tapp Field, May 5th 1864

Just as Richard Ewell had thrown off Gouverneur Warren’s advance south to Todd’s Tavern on the morning of May 5th, so did A.P. Hill surprise Brigadier General Samuel Crawford down along the Orange Plank Road. The Confederate general met with some thin resistance of New York cavalry and effectively cut off the Federal cavalry unit… Continue reading “Death Held High Carnival” – Widow Tapp Field, May 5th 1864