Battles in the West, Portraits of Privates, Traveling Tidbits, Women in the War

Chalmette Battlefield – Nexus of Wars

Those who know their Civil War history, will know that New Orleans was barely fought over in 1862. The city was practically handed over to the Federal Army. The same can’t be said for a battle that occurred just outside of New Orleans earlier in the century. Made infamous by a terribly inaccurate song by… Continue reading Chalmette Battlefield – Nexus of Wars

Civil War Trivia, Women in the War

To Those Not So Merry This Christmas…

I believe I can say with some agreement upon the reader’s part that 2020 has not been the best year. The good news is that it’s almost over, and the hope of a brighter and better 2021 is on the horizon. As Christmas Day dawns, I hope this post finds you and your loved ones… Continue reading To Those Not So Merry This Christmas…

Women in the War

Nurses of the Wilderness – Hill, Hancock, and Barlow

With the massive influx of casualties in the Wilderness, doctors and nurses were working double-time to tend to the wounded in both blue and gray. Thanks to the efforts of dedicated doctors like Jonathon Letterman, the wounded of the Overland Campaign were in a better situation to be efficiently treated than those of previous campaigns.… Continue reading Nurses of the Wilderness – Hill, Hancock, and Barlow

Women in the War

A Union Sympathizer in the Wilderness – Katherine Couse

About ten miles southeast of the Widow Tapp Field sits another home that would come under the shadow of war. Katherine Couse, a 28 year-old New Jersey native, was a Union sympathizer like the rest of her family. Her parents, William and Elizabeth owned close to 1,400 acres of farmland in an area known as… Continue reading A Union Sympathizer in the Wilderness – Katherine Couse

Women in the War

Drama and Scandal in the Wilderness – Phenie Tapp’s Story

On a cold February day in 1860, a child was born in a cabin owned by the widow, Catherine Tapp. The baby girl was named Eliza Frances, but was known to her family and all those in Spotsylvania County as Phenie Tapp. The situation of the child’s birth – and her later escapades as an… Continue reading Drama and Scandal in the Wilderness – Phenie Tapp’s Story

Battles in the East, Historical Homes, Women in the War

Ellwood Manor – Connections in the Wilderness

There’s a saying that every human being on the planet is connected by just six degrees of separation. Nowhere is this more exemplified than in the case of Ellwood Manor, nestled in the heart of the Wilderness. The legacy begins with two brothers. William and Churchill Jones were the sons of Churchill Jones and Millicent… Continue reading Ellwood Manor – Connections in the Wilderness

Story of Slavery, Women in the War

A Black Woman’s Civil War Memoir – Susie King Taylor

I’m a little late to the party for Black History Month, but better late than never. I had seen this picture many times before in my travels and studies of the Civil War, but it wasn’t until recently that I became aware of this woman’s story and struggle. Susie King Taylor, born Susie Ann Baker… Continue reading A Black Woman’s Civil War Memoir – Susie King Taylor

Historical Homes, Women in the War

Chancellorsville Mansion – One House, So Much History

This statement is not for history buffs. This statement is for those who are just getting into Civil War military history or who did not read my previous posts about that pivotal battle in May of 1863. Chancellorsville was NOT a town. It was not a city. It might have had a post office, but… Continue reading Chancellorsville Mansion – One House, So Much History

Women in the War

Nellie M. Chase – Nightingale of Fredericksburg

It’s interesting what rabbit holes a researcher can fall into by accident. I have an extensive wish list for Civil War books. One of which I finally acquired last week, Women of the War: Their Heroism and Self-Sacrifice by Frank Moore. While perusing through the back description, I caught the word “Fredericksburg” and immediately flipped… Continue reading Nellie M. Chase – Nightingale of Fredericksburg

Story of Slavery, Women in the War

Mary Blackford – Advocate for Colonization

Many like to think that the Civil War was a strict divide of north and south. Those in the north believed in the power of the Union and that slavery was morally wrong. Those in the south believed in minimal government interference in state matters and endorsed slavery. However, the truth is far more complex… Continue reading Mary Blackford – Advocate for Colonization