Uncategorized

A Note From Your Civil War Traveler…

To the faithful readers and followers of my blog, a notice: The month of May and June will be extremely busy for me, both personally and professionally. My husband and I are in the process of finishing construction on our first home and we’re doing a heap of the work ourselves, so it’s all hands… Continue reading A Note From Your Civil War Traveler…

Uncategorized

Walton Guards in Civil War Times!

For those who subscribe to Civil War Times (and if you don’t, you should!), check out page 54! I was granted a great opportunity to write for the magazine and chose a topic that hits close to home and close to my heart. Civil War Times, June 2022 issue The company named The Walton Guards… Continue reading Walton Guards in Civil War Times!

Traveling Tidbits

Coffee Call – A Baton Rouge Tradition

Baton Rouge is a pretty big city. Driving down the busy streets and visiting its many historical sites can make it hard to find the right place for a cup of coffee and a good casual Louisiana breakfast. Good thing there’s Coffee Call! Founded in 1976 by Vincent Cannatella Sr., Coffee Call has become a… Continue reading Coffee Call – A Baton Rouge Tradition

Story of Slavery, Traveling Tidbits

Stepping Into Rural Life in Louisiana

Louisiana, especially the southeast region of the state, is well known for its historic plantations like Oak Alley, Whitney, Laura, Houmas House, etc. They also don’t lack for museums that interpret their rich history from the French colonial era to the Civil Rights movement. One such museum that does an admirable and thorough job at… Continue reading Stepping Into Rural Life in Louisiana

Civil War Trivia, Story of Slavery

Disunion – A Precursor of the Civil War

Disunion was nothing new to American politics. Since the ratification of the Constitution (which ended the period of governing under the Articles of Confederation that gave individual states more autonomy than the federal government) the idea of disunion had been thrown around by politicians and journalists alike. The notion of disunion manifested in a variety… Continue reading Disunion – A Precursor of the Civil War

Battles in the East, Portraits of Privates

Hunting Down a Soldier – Part 2

To catch up on my adventures in research, check out Part 1. The 6th Louisiana Infantry’s baptism of fire would come on May 23rd, 1862 at the town of Front Royal, Virginia in the Shenandoah Valley. General Richard Taylor’s Louisiana Brigade under General Thomas “Stonewall Jackson” chased Maryland skirmishers through the town and storm a… Continue reading Hunting Down a Soldier – Part 2

Battles in the East, Portraits of Privates

Hunting Down a Soldier – Part 1

All I had was a name. A name that meant little, but it sparked a search that turned into something obsessive.   When I first began studying the Civil War, I wanted to know what most historians or budding history scholars wanted to know. Do I have any connection to the war? Do I have… Continue reading Hunting Down a Soldier – Part 1

Women in the War

Delity Powell Kelly – More From a Child of the Confederacy

Some who follow both my blog and the Emerging Civil War Blog may be familiar with my first guest post, back in 2020, which discussed the life and war experiences of Delity Powell Kelly, a child who followed her father's artillery company at the young age of 10. For those who haven’t read about her,… Continue reading Delity Powell Kelly – More From a Child of the Confederacy

Traveling Tidbits

Roaming the Aisles of Baine’s Books & Coffee

For those who know me, books and coffee are my “thing”. I think the idea of a bookstore inside a coffee shop – or vice versa – is brilliant and a true fantasy of mine. And I’m not talking about the little coffee corner in bookstores like Barnes & Noble. I’m talking about getting a… Continue reading Roaming the Aisles of Baine’s Books & Coffee

Traveling Tidbits

Walking the Surrender at Appomattox Court House

Visiting the site of Appomattox Court House today is a treat of mid-nineteenth century and Civil War living history interpretation. It’s not just a museum or a single house that’s been set up to rebuild the surrender scene. It’s a recreation of the sleepy town of Appomattox Court House, complete with homes, shops, and streets… Continue reading Walking the Surrender at Appomattox Court House